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Hydration: A NEW PARADIGM
By Paul Harris, Ph.D.

Dyspeptic Pain and Water - Part 4

The Three Stages of Water Regulation
The Multiple Role of Water
Dyspeptic Pain and Water
Low Back Pain & Water Uptake
Dehydration and Compensation Mechanisms
The Sleeper Phenomenon
How to Use Hydrate 1

Dyspeptic pain is indicative of dehydration, and is a thirst signal. More specifically-gastritis pain, duodenitis, and heartburn are important signals of dehydration. However, ulcers require more rigid dietary management in addition to water intake. Dr. Batmanghelidj published an editorial article in the Journal of clinical Gastroenterology in 1983 in which he describes his successful treatment of over 3000 persons with dyspeptic pain. His only medication was water. He states, "They all responded to an increase in their water intake, and the clinical problems associated with the pain disappeared."

Research has shown that after consumption of a glass of water---it is immediately transported to the intestines and absorbed. Within 30 minutes, almost the same quantity of water is secreted in the mucocsal glandular layer of the stomach-ready to assist in the digestive process. Adequate amounts of water are critical for good digestion. The glandular layer of the stomach is normally covered in mucus. Mucus consists of 98 percent water, and two percent, the physical "scaffolding" that traps water. This protects the inner lining of the stomach by acting as a natural buffer state.

An important part of this buffer system is sodium bicarbonate. Sodium bicarb becomes trapped in the water layer. This provides protection for the stomach from excessive acid production, by neutralizing it. The result of this natural biochemical reaction is an increased salt production, (sodium from the bicarb, and chlorine from the acid). Excess sodium changes the water holding properties of the "scaffolding" material of mucus. Excessive acid neutralization, and deposition of sodium in the mucus layer would make it less homogeneous, and will allow penetration of the mucocsal layer, resulting in dyspeptic pain. The resecretion of water through the mucus layer appears to exert a "back-washing effect" on the mucus layer, removing the salt deposits. The effectiveness of this phenomenon, of course, is dependent upon water intake.

As a note of caution: Pains that do not respond to an increased water intake over a period of time, could be the result of a serious pathological condition. It would be prudent for you to consult your family physician.

Other conditions responding well to proper hydration are colitis, and false appendicitis pain. Rheumatoid arthritis pains can initially considered indicators of a lack of adequate hydration in the affected joint cartilage surfaces. The cartilage surfaces of bones in a joint contain much water. The "held water" provides a lubricating quality. A well hydrated joint obtains its nutrition from the blood supply to its base attachment to the bone. A dehydrated joint will get some form of fluid circulation from the capsule of the joint, producing swelling, and tenderness in the joint capsule.

The Three Stages of Water Regulation
The Multiple Role of Water
Dyspeptic Pain and Water
Low Back Pain & Water Uptake
Dehydration and Compensation Mechanisms
The Sleeper Phenomenon
How to Use Hydrate 1

 


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